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Verizon

Yahoo Mail – The “OATH” to spy and track you

“Yahoo is now part of Oath, the media and tech company behind today’s top news, sports and entertainment sites and apps.”

..and behind overt violations of your privacy

This includes: analyzing content and information when you use our services (including emails, instant messages, posts, photos, attachments, and other communications), linking your activity on other sites and apps with information we have about you, and providing anonymized and/or aggregated reports to other parties regarding user trends. …sharing Data with Verizon. Oath and its affiliates may share the information we receive with Verizon.

Verizon – another bad actor when it comes to privacy and acting like a monopoly

And of course, like Facebook, they buy other data sources, combine it and build a profile on you

Information from Others. We collect information about you when we receive it from other users, third-parties, and affiliates, such as:

When you connect your account to third-party services or sign in using a third-party partner (like Facebook or Twitter).
From publicly-available sources.
From advertisers about your experiences or interactions with their offerings.
When we obtain information from third-parties or other companies, such as those that use our Services. This may include your activity on other sites and apps as well as information those third-parties provide to you or us.
We may also receive information from Verizon and will honor the choices Verizon customers have made about the uses of this information when we receive and use this data.

The details — full privacy policy here

Just say no to Yahoo and OATH which includes AOL

AT&T/Verizon lobbyists to “aggressively” sue states that enact net neutrality

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The dangers of oligopolies. More than anything else the internet needs is trust busters.

A lobby group that represents AT&T, Verizon, and other telcos plans to sue states and cities that try to enforce net neutrality rules.

USTelecom, the lobby group, made its intentions clear yesterday in a blog post titled, “All Americans Deserve Equal Rights Online.”

Yeah – All Americans == all their fellow oligopolists

“Broadband providers have worked hard over the past 20 years to deploy ever more sophisticated, faster and higher-capacity networks, and uphold net neutrality protections for all,” USTelecom CEO Jonathan Spalter wrote. “To continue this important work, there is no question we will aggressively challenge state or municipal attempts to fracture the federal regulatory structure that made all this progress possible.”

The USTelecom board of directors includes AT&T, Verizon, Frontier, CenturyLink, Windstream, and other telcos. The group’s membership “ranges from the nation’s largest telecom companies to small rural cooperatives.”

Verizon’s hidden Super Cookie to get larger role

Verizon_Hack
Verizon purchased AOL earlier this year and now is breathing new life in their invasive (lack of) privacy policy

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The Relevant Mobile Advertising program uses your postal and email addresses, certain information about your Verizon products and services (such as device type), and information we obtain from other companies (such as gender, age range, and interests). The separate Verizon Selects program uses this same information plus additional information about your use of Verizon services including mobile Web browsing, app and feature usage and location of your device. The AOL Advertising Network uses information collected when you use AOL services and visit third-party websites where AOL provides advertising services (such as Web browsing, app usage, and location), as well as information that AOL obtains from third-party partners and advertisers.
We do not share information that identifies you personally as part of these programs other than with vendors and partners who do work for us. We require that these vendors and partners protect the information and use it only for the services they are providing us.

That is BS Verizon, you collect “postal and email addresses”… “gender, age range, and interests” what else do you, need to identify the user. His/her shoe size?

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Privacy advocates say that Verizon and AOL’s use of the identifier is problematic for two reasons: Not only is the invasive tracking enabled by default, but it also sends the information unencrypted, so that it can easily be intercepted.

“It’s an insecure bundle of information following people around on the Web,” said Deji Olukotun of Access, a digital rights organization.
Verizon, which has 135 million wireless customers, says it is will share the identifier with “a very limited number of other partners and they will only be able to use it for Verizon and AOL purposes,” said Karen Zacharia, chief privacy officer at Verizon.

In order for the tracking to work, Verizon needs to repeatedly insert the identifier into users’ Internet traffic. The identifier can’t be inserted when the traffic is encrypted, such as when a user logs into their bank account.

Previously, Verizon had been sending the undeletable identifier to every website visited by smartphone users on its network 2014 even if the user had opted out. But after ProPublica revealed earlier this year that an advertising company was using the identifier to recreate advertising cookies that users had deleted, Verizon began allowing users to truly opt-out, meaning that it won’t send the identifier to subscribers who say they don’t want it.
Verizon users are still automatically opted into the program.

“I think in some ways it’s more privacy protective because it’s all within one company,” said Verizon’s Zacharia. “We are going to be sharing segment information with AOL so that customers can receive more personalized advertising.”

A recent report by Access found that other large carriers such as AT&T and Vodafone are also using a similar technique to track their users.
In order for Verizon users to opt-out, they have to log into their account or call 1-866-211-0874.

Remember, as a Verizon subscriber, you are paying Verizon to farm your data and use it make more money. Furthermore, the unencrypted streams leave you & your phone open to hacking and all the issues that can cause. Verizon and their ilk are despicable.