And from the bs department

QUOTE

…Stop me if you’ve heard this before: The chief executive of a huge tech company with vast stores of user data, and a business built on using it to target ads, now says his priority is privacy.

This time it was Google’s Sundar Pichai, at the company’s annual conference for developers. “We think privacy is for everyone,” he explained on Tuesday. “We want to do more to stay ahead of constantly evolving user expectations.” He reiterated the point in a New York Times Op-Ed, and highlighted the need for federal privacy rules.

The previous week, Mark Zuckerberg delivered similar messages at Facebook’s developer conference. “The future is private,” he said, and Facebook will focus on more intimate communications. He shared the idea in a Washington Post op-ed just weeks before, also highlighting the need for federal privacy rules.

Google went further than Facebook’s rough sketch of what this future looks, and unveiled tangible features: It will let users browse YouTube and Google Maps in “incognito mode,” will allow auto-deletion of Google history after a specified time and will make it easier to find out what the company knows about you, among other new privacy features.

Fatemeh Khatibloo, a vice president and principal analyst at Forrester, told The Times: “These are meaningful changes when it comes to the user’s expectations of privacy, but I don’t think this affects their business at all.” Google has to show that privacy is important, but it will still collect data.

What Google and Facebook are trying to do, though, is reshape the privacy narrative. You may think privacy means keeping hold of your data; they want privacy to mean they don’t hand data to others. (“Google will never sell any personal information to third parties,” Mr. Pichai wrote in his Op-Ed.)

Werner Goertz, a research director at Gartner, said Google had to respond with its own narrative. “It is trying to turn the conversation around and drive public discourse in a way that not only pacifies but also tries to get buy-in from consumers, to align them with its privacy strategy,” he said.
Politics of privacy law

Right – pacify the masses with BS.

Politics of privacy law

Facebook and Google may share a voice on privacy. Lawmakers don’t.

Members of the Federal Trade Commission renewed calls at a congressional hearing on Wednesday to regulate big tech companies’ stewardship of user data, my colleague Cecilia Kang reported. That was before a House Energy and Commerce subcommittee, on which “lawmakers of both parties agreed” that such a law was required, The Wall Street Journal reported.

Sounds promising.

But while the F.T.C. was united in asking for more power to police violations and greater authority to impose penalties, there were large internal tensions about how far it should be able to go in punishing companies. And the lawmakers in Congress “appeared divided over key points that legislation might address,” according to The Journal. Democrats favor harsh penalties and want to give the F.T.C. greater power; Republicans worry that strict regulation could stifle innovation and hurt smaller companies.

Finding compromise will be difficult, and conflicting views risk becoming noise through which a clear voice from Facebook and Google can cut. The longer disagreement rages, the more likely it is that Silicon Valley defines a mainstream view that could shape rules.

Yeah — more lobbyists and political donation subverting the democracy. The US should enact an EU equivalent GDPR now. And another thing, Zuckerberg’s cynical attempt to change the narrative by implementing end to end encryption is simply a bad idea. It gets them off the hook to moderate content (read: more profits), still allows them to sell ads and makes it nearly impossible for law enforcement to do their job. Hey Zuck, why not hand hang a sign out: criminals, pedophiles, gangs, repressive regimes, etc. – “all welcome here.”