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Social Media Privacy

Facebook Wielded Data to Reward, Punish Rivals, Emails Show

Is anyone surprised?

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Facebook Inc. wielded user data like a bargaining chip, providing access when that sharing might encourage people to spend more time on the social network — and imposing strict limits on partners in cases where it saw a potential competitive threat, emails show.

A trove of internal correspondence, published online Wednesday by U.K. lawmakers, provides a look into the ways Facebook bosses, including Chief Executive Officer Mark Zuckerberg, treated information posted by users like a commodity that could be harnessed in service of business goals. Apps were invited to use Facebook’s network to grow, as long as that increased usage of Facebook. Certain competitors, in a list reviewed by Zuckerberg himself, were not allowed to use Facebook’s tools and data without his personal sign-off.

In early 2013, Twitter Inc. launched the Vine video-sharing service, which drew on a Facebook tool that let Vine users connect to their Facebook friends. Alerted to the possible competitive threat by an engineer who recommended cutting off Vine’s access to Facebook data, Zuckerberg replied succinctly: “Yup, go for it.”

A spokeswoman for Twitter declined to comment.

In other cases Zuckerberg eloquently espoused the value of giving software developers more access to user data in hopes that it would result in applications that, in turn, would encourage people to do more on Facebook. “We’re trying to enable people to share everything they want, and to do it on Facebook,” Zuckerberg wrote in a November 2012 email. “Sometimes the best way to enable people to share something is to have a developer build a special purpose app or network for that type of content and to make that app social by having Facebook plug into it. However, that may be good for the world but it’s not good for us unless people also share back to Facebook and that content increases the value of our network.”

U.S. Lawmaker Says Facebook Cannot Be Trusted to Regulate Itself

No shit Sherlock

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WASHINGTON — Democratic U.S. Representative David Cicilline, expected to become the next chairman of House Judiciary Committee’s antitrust panel, said on Wednesday that Facebook Inc cannot be trusted to regulate itself and Congress should take action.

Cicilline, citing a report in the New York Times on Facebook’s efforts to deal with a series of crises, said on Twitter: “This staggering report makes clear that @Facebook executives will always put their massive profits ahead of the interests of their customers.”

“It is long past time for us to take action,” he said.

Facebook did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg said a year ago that the company would put its “community” before profit, and it has doubled its staff focused on safety and security issues since then. Spending also has increased on developing automated tools to catch propaganda and material that violates the company’s posting policies.

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“We’ve known for some time that @Facebook chose to turn a blind eye to the spread of hate speech and Russian propaganda on its platform,” said Cicilline, who will likely take the reins of the subcommittee on regulatory reform, commercial and antitrust law when the new, Democratic-controlled Congress is seated in January.

“Now we know that once they knew the truth, top @Facebook executives did everything they could to hide it from the public by using a playbook of suppressing opposition and propagating conspiracy theories,” he said.

“Next January, Congress should get to work enacting new laws to hold concentrated economic power to account, address the corrupting influence of corporate money in our democracy, and restore the rights of Americans,” Cicilline said.

B.S. — Facebook can never put “community” before profits because its that community and the rape of their privacy that is the core Facebook business model. Who they kidding?

‘No Morals’: Advertisers React to Facebook Report

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Several top marketers were openly critical of the tech giant, a day after The New York Times published an investigation detailing how Facebook’s top executives — Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg — made the company’s growth a priority while ignoring and hiding warning signs over how its data and power were being exploited to disrupt elections and spread toxic content. The article also spotlighted a lobbying campaign overseen by Ms. Sandberg, who also oversees advertising, that sought to shift public anger to Facebook’s critics and rival tech firms.

The revelations may be “the straw that breaks the camel’s back,” said Rishad Tobaccowala, chief growth officer for the Publicis Groupe, one of the world’s biggest ad companies. “Now we know Facebook will do whatever it takes to make money. They have absolutely no morals.”

Marketers have grumbled about Facebook in the past, concerned that advertisements could appear next to misinformation and hate speech on the platform. They have complained about how the company handles consumer data and how it measures ads and its user base. But those issues were not enough to outweigh the lure of Facebook’s vast audience and the company’s insistence that it was trying to address its flaws.

And after this article was published online, Mr. Tobaccowala called The New York Times to add to his comments.

“The people there do,” he said, referring to possessing morals, “but as a business, they seem to have lost their compass.”

“So far, the track record basically has been that regardless of what Facebook does, they keep getting more money,” Mr. Tobaccowala said. “The question simply is, will this make people wake up?”

Good question! The stupidity of their user base and the equal stupidity, well actually complicity of their advertisers is a disgrace. What it may take is people to boycott those companies that advertise on Facebook. Maybe in this manner, the final nails can be put into the Facebook coffin.

Facebook Tells Advertisers It Can Reach Many Young People. Too Many

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Facebook faced criticism on Wednesday after an analyst pointed out that the company’s online advertising tools claim they can reach 25 million more young Americans than the United States census says exist.

The analyst, Brian Wieser at Pivotal Research, said in a note Tuesday that Facebook’s Ads Manager says it can potentially reach 41 million 18- to 24-year-olds in the United States and 60 million 25- to 34-year-olds. The catch, according to Mr. Wieser: the census counted just 31 million 18-to-24-year-olds last year and 45 million 25-to-34-year-olds.

“The buyers and marketers I talked to were unaware of this and they are using it for planning purposes,” Mr. Wieser said in an interview. “Buyers are still going to buy from them and plan for them, but this is something that doesn’t need to be an error and puts every other metric they might provide into question.”

The criticism over audience figures comes as Facebook disclosed on Wednesday that hundreds of fake accounts apparently based in Russia had purchased $100,000 worth of political advertising during the American presidential election last year; the tech firm said it had shut down the accounts.

The census figure discrepancy is likely to be a setback for Facebook with advertisers and a boon for outside measurement companies like Nielsen and ComScore, particularly as Facebook vies to make video advertising a bigger part of its business, Mr. Wieser said. Mr. Wieser is one of two analysts with a “sell” rating on Facebook shares, compared to 42 “buy” recommendations and three “hold” ratings, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

Unethical disgusting company that deserves to be kicked to the curb. Delete your facebook account now.

Facebook targets ads using phone numbers submitted for security purposes

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If you sometimes — or often — wonder how or why you’re seeing a certain ad online, here’s a possible answer.

Most Facebook users know the company targets ads based on information they willingly give the company, but researchers have found that the social media giant also targets ads based on information users may not know is being used to target them — or information they did not explicitly give the company.

For example, phone numbers provided for two-factor authentication are also being used to target ads on Facebook, according to a new report that cites a study, titled “Investigating sources of PII used in Facebook’s targeted advertising,” by researchers from Northeastern and Princeton universities.

When a user gives Facebook a phone number for two-factor authentication or for the purpose of receiving alerts about log-ins, “that phone number became targetable by an advertiser within a couple of weeks,” Gizmodo reported.

A company spokeswoman told Gizmodo that “we use the information people provide to offer a more personalized experience, including showing more relevant ads.” The spokeswoman pointed out that people can set up two-factor authentication without offering their phone numbers.

However, the study also shows — and Gizmodo tested, by successfully targeting an ad at a computer science professor using a landline phone number — that contacts of Facebook users can be targeted without their consent. Facebook users who share their contacts are exposing those contacts to potential ad targeting.

This means that, as a Facebook spokeswoman told Gizmodo, “We understand that in some cases this may mean that another person may not be able to control the contact information someone else uploads about them.”

A Facebook spokeswoman told this news organization Thursday: “We are clear about how we use the information we collect, including the contact information that people upload or add to their own accounts. You can manage and delete the contact information you’ve uploaded at any time.”

In the study, the researchers said Facebook’s use of personally identifiable information in this way is to be expected, given that it’s the business the company is in. “This incentive is exacerbated with the recent introduction of PII-based targeting, which allows advertisers to specify exactly which users to target by specifying a list of their PII,” they said.

Facebook Does it Again! 50 million Facebook accounts breached

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Facebook reset logins for millions of customers last night as it dealt with a data breach that may have exposed nearly 50 million accounts. The breach was caused by an exploit of three bugs in Facebook’s code that were introduced with the addition of a new video uploader in July of 2017. Facebook patched the vulnerabilities on Thursday, and it revoked access tokens for a total of 90 million users

In a call with press today, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said that the attack targeted the “view as” feature, “code that allowed people to see what other people were seeing when they viewed their profile,” Zuckerberg said. The attackers were able to use this feature, combined with the video uploader feature, to harvest access tokens. A surge in usage of the feature was detected on September 16, triggering the investigation that eventually discovered the breach.

“The attackers did try to query our APIs—but we do not yet know if any private information was exposed,” Zuckerberg said. The attackers used the profile retrieval API, which provides access to the information presented in a user’s profile page, but there’s no evidence yet that Facebook messages or other private data was viewed. No credit card data or other information was exposed, according to Facebook.

Regardless, the breach could do further damage to Facebook’s reputation as the company continues to attempt to regain public trust after a recent string of security and privacy issues. In addition to revelations about the misuse of Facebook user data by Cambridge Analytica during the run-up to the 2016 US presidential election, there have been questions about how Facebook itself uses customer data, including the discovery that Facebook had been routinely collecting full call logs and other data from some mobile users.

And if there were not 100 other reasons to ditch facebook, how about this?

Earlier this week, Facebook acknowledged that it provided phone numbers used for two-factor authentication to advertisers for the purpose of targeting users with advertisements. And Facebook’s Onavo virtual private network application was yanked from Apple’s App Store in August because it was being used by Facebook to collect data about users’ mobile application usage.

Facebook pulls ‘snoopy’ Onavo VPN from Apple’s App Store after falling foul of rules

Just say no to Facebook, they will never change, they can’t, because your private data is their product.

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Facebook has pulled its data-snaffling Onavo VPN from Apple’s App Store after the iGiant said the tech violated recently tightened rules.

Onavo is a free VPN app that pipes user traffic through Facebook systems under the pretext of protecting surfers from malware-tainted websites and other threats. The app, which the social network acquired in 2013, sends users’ data back to Facebook, even when the app is turned off.

Security advocates have blasted Onavo for being a privacy threat, as previously reported. Onavo Protect was separately criticised for allegedly harvesting users’ psychological profiles.

Facebook has been accused of using the data gathered through the app to track rivals and provide pointers on new product development. Data from Onavo lit the way for its 2014 purchase of WhatsApp as well as the social network’s excursion into live video in 2016.

Apple updated its App Store guidelines in June to ban “[collecting] information about which other apps are installed on a user’s device for the purposes of analytics or advertising/marketing”. Apple also informed Facebook that Onavo violated developer rules that prevent apps from using data beyond what’s needed to deliver the service on offer, The Wall Street Journal reported

Break up Facebook up

Since the users of Facebook will never take action to fix their addiction, perhaps it is time for regulators to step in. The history of egregious breaches of public trust and leaks of privacy at Facebook demand action.

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When the government broke up the telephone system in 1984, the fact that AT&T could count most citizens as customers and that it was arguably the best-run telephone company in the world was not deemed compelling enough to preserve its monopoly power. The breakup would unleash a wave of competition and innovation that ultimately benefited consumers and the economy.

Facebook seems to be in a similar position today — only with far greater global reach than Ma Bell could have imagined. Facebook’s two billion monthly active users, and the way those accounts are linked and viewed by users and by third parties, have made it the most powerful communications and media company in the world, even if its chief executive, Mark Zuckerberg, insists his is a technology business.

And that power is being abused. As The New York Times reported Tuesday, Facebook shared data with at least four Chinese electronics firms, including one flagged by American officials as a national security threat. We learned earlier this week, thanks to a Times investigation, that it allowed phone and other device makers, including Amazon, Apple, Samsung and Microsoft, to see vast amounts of your personal information without your knowledge. That behavior appears to violate a consent order that Facebook agreed to with the Federal Trade Commission in 2011, after Facebook was found to have made repeated changes to its privacy settings that allowed the company to transfer user data without bothering to inform the users. And it follows the even darker revelation that Facebook allowed a trove of information, including users’ education levels, likes, locations, and religious and political affiliations, to be exploited by the data mining firm Cambridge Analytica to manipulate potential voters for its Republican Party clients.

Throughout its history, Facebook has adamantly argued that it treats our data, and who has access to it, as a sort of sacred trust, with Zuckerberg & Company being the trustees. Yet at the same time, Facebook has continued to undermine privacy by making it cumbersome to opt out of sharing, trying to convince users that we actually do want to share all of our personal information (and some people actually do) and by leaving the door unlocked for its partners and clients to come in and help themselves. Those partners have included 60 device makers that used application programming interfaces, also known as A.P.I.s, so Facebook could run on their gadgets.

In Facebook’s view those partners functioned as extensions of the Facebook app itself and offered similar privacy protections. And the company said that most of this intrusive behavior happened a decade ago, when mobile apps barely existed and Facebook had to program its way onto those devices. “We controlled them tightly from the get-go,” said Facebook’s Ime Archibong, vice president for product partnerships, in a response to The Times’s article. Yet a Times reporter was able to retrieve information on 295,000 Facebook users using a five-year-old BlackBerry.

Facebook Gave Data Access to Chinese Firm Flagged by U.S. Intelligence

Suprise Surprise Surprise! Just say no to Facebook!

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Facebook has data-sharing partnerships with at least four Chinese electronics companies, including a manufacturing giant that has a close relationship with China’s government, the social media company said on Tuesday.

The agreements, which date to at least 2010, gave private access to some user data to Huawei, a telecommunications equipment company that has been flagged by American intelligence officials as a national security threat, as well as to Lenovo, Oppo and TCL.

The four partnerships remain in effect, but Facebook officials said in an interview that the company would wind down the Huawei deal by the end of the week.

Facebook gave access to the Chinese device makers along with other manufacturers — including Amazon, Apple, BlackBerry and Samsung — whose agreements were disclosed by The New York Times on Sunday.

The deals were part of an effort to push more mobile users onto the social network starting in 2007, before stand-alone Facebook apps worked well on phones. The agreements allowed device makers to offer some Facebook features, such as address books, “like” buttons and status updates.

Facebook Gave Device Makers Deep Access to Data on Users and Friends

Dear Facebook users, you are the product, you are also morons. Freedom and privacy are rights that need to be defended, not given away for convenience.

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As Facebook sought to become the world’s dominant social media service, it struck agreements allowing phone and other device makers access to vast amounts of its users’ personal information.

Facebook has reached data-sharing partnerships with at least 60 device makers — including Apple, Amazon, BlackBerry, Microsoft and Samsung — over the last decade, starting before Facebook apps were widely available on smartphones, company officials said. The deals allowed Facebook to expand its reach and let device makers offer customers popular features of the social network, such as messaging, “like” buttons and address books.

But the partnerships, whose scope has not previously been reported, raise concerns about the company’s privacy protections and compliance with a 2011 consent decree with the Federal Trade Commission. Facebook allowed the device companies access to the data of users’ friends without their explicit consent, even after declaring that it would no longer share such information with outsiders. Some device makers could retrieve personal information even from users’ friends who believed they had barred any sharing, The New York Times found.