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Social Media Privacy

Deleting Linkedin

Wow, what a disgusting company Linkedin (Microsoft Owner) has become. Today: 160 trackers (and counting) and canvas tracking. Linkedin is now little more than spyware and on par with the likes of that disgusting company Facebook. In case anyone interested: https://www.linkedin.com/help/linkedin/answer/63/closing-your-linkedin-account?lang=en One can download all data prior to closing account. We are in the process of doing this.

By the way, don’t take my word “The People Agree: Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn Are All Worse than Bank of America” Motley Fool: https://www.fool.com/investing/general/2014/01/05/the-people-agree-twitter-facebook-and-linkedin-are.aspx

Wow – worse than Bank of America. I did not think that possible!

BOGUS SCIENCE: Facebook Takes On Tricky Public Health Role

Among the other 100s of reasons, it is time to stop using Facebook.

A police officer on the late shift in an Ohio town recently received an unusual call from Facebook.

Earlier that day, a local woman wrote a Facebook post saying she was walking home and intended to kill herself when she got there, according to a police report on the case. Facebook called to warn the Police Department about the suicide threat.

The officer who took the call quickly located the woman, but she denied having suicidal thoughts, the police report said. Even so, the officer believed she might harm herself and told the woman that she must go to a hospital — either voluntarily or in police custody. He ultimately drove her to a hospital for a mental health work-up, an evaluation prompted by Facebook’s intervention. (The New York Times withheld some details of the case for privacy reasons.)
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Facebook has computer algorithms that scan the posts, comments and videos of users in the United States and other countries for indications of immediate suicide risk. When a post is flagged, by the technology or a concerned user, it moves to human reviewers at the company, who are empowered to call local law enforcement.

“In the last year, we’ve helped first responders quickly reach around 3,500 people globally who needed help,” Mr. Zuckerberg wrote in a November post about the efforts.

But other mental health experts said Facebook’s calls to the police could also cause harm — such as unintentionally precipitating suicide, compelling nonsuicidal people to undergo psychiatric evaluations, or prompting arrests or shootings.

And, they said, it is unclear whether the company’s approach is accurate, effective or safe. Facebook said that, for privacy reasons, it did not track the outcomes of its calls to the police. And it has not disclosed exactly how its reviewers decide whether to call emergency responders. Facebook, critics said, has assumed the authority of a public health agency while protecting its process as if it were a corporate secret.

Yes you read that right. “Facebook said that, for privacy reasons, it did not track the outcomes of its calls to the police.” B.S. — how about formal clinical trials like the rest of the medical world? Their algorithm should get FDA approval first at a minimum.

“It’s hard to know what Facebook is actually picking up on, what they are actually acting on, and are they giving the appropriate response to the appropriate risk,” said Dr. John Torous, director of the digital psychiatry division at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. “It’s black box medicine.”


“In this climate in which trust in Facebook is really eroding, it concerns me that Facebook is just saying, ‘Trust us here,’” said Mr. Marks, a fellow at Yale Law School and New York University School of Law.

Right – Trust Facebook? Never. I submit the real reason that miscreant Zuckerberg is doing this is that it is now well known that a plausible link exists between increased social media use and depression and suicide. Just say no to Facebook.

2012 – Social Media and Suicide: A Public Health Perspective

2017 – The Risk Of Teen Depression And Suicide Is Linked To Smartphone Use

Facebook apologizes for bug leaking private photos

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Hah hah hah – Facebook apologizes…deja vu (weekly)

Data gathering biz still having trouble keeping data secure

Why – because they do not want to. It is their business stupid!

Facebook on Friday apologized for a bug that may have exposed exposed private photos to third-party apps for the 12 day period from September 13 to September 25, 2018.

Yep you read that right – September 2018! Who do you think your fooling Zuckerberg (of …sorry, yes, of course, all the zuckers that use your site).

“We’re sorry this happened,” said Tomer Bar, Facebook engineering director, in a blog post intended for developers, noting that as many as 6.8 million users and 1,500 apps from by 876 developers may be affected.

Tomer explained that when a Facebook user grants permission for an app to access that individual’s photos on Facebook, the service should only grant access to photos shared on timelines.

Instead, the bug made photos shared elsewhere – in Marketplace or Facebook Stories – or uploaded but never posted available to developers’ apps, specifically those that had been approved by Facebook to use the photos API and by users.

Facebook intends to notify affected individuals, so they can check their photo apps for images that shouldn’t be there. And next week, the company says it will provide developers with a tool to determine which users of their apps may have been affected and to assist with the deletion of images that shouldn’t be there.

It was only a few days after the period of vulnerability, on September 28, that Facebook said a different bug had exposed as many as 90 million Facebook profiles to hackers, a figure it subsequently revised down to 30 million.

90 Million? Geez — no wonder miscreants have such an easy time influencing opinion.

In response to that incident, Guy Rosen, VP of product management, apologized.
This is getting to be a habit

The social data biz has apologized so often that its serial contrition came up when CEO Mark Zuckerberg testified before the House Energy and Commerce Committee in April.

Addressing Zuckerberg at the hearing, Rep. Jan Schakowsky (D-IL) said, “You have a long history of growth and success, but you also have a long list of apologies.” She then recited a partial litany of his mea culpas over the years:

“I apologize for any harm done as a result of my neglect.” – Harvard, 2003
“We really messed this one up.” – Facebook, 2006
“We simply did a bad job [with this release, and] I apologize for it.” – Facebook, 2007
“Sometimes we move too fast…” – Facebook, 2010
“I’m the first to admit we made a bunch of mistakes.” – Facebook, 2011
“[For those I hurt this year,] I ask forgiveness and I will try to be better.” Facebook, 2017

Schakowsky concluded from this that Facebook’s self-regulation doesn’t work.

No shit Jan — and no need to stop with them. It is the enter industry that has grown up mining, sharing and selling personal data that must be disassembled.

Legislative regulation may not be working either. Facebook in April, shortly after Zuckerberg’s Congressional testimony, made much of its effort to comply with Europe’s GDPR privacy regime.

“As soon as GDPR was finalized, we realized it was an opportunity to invest even more heavily in privacy,” said Erin Egan, veep and chief privacy officer of policy, and Ashlie Beringer, veep and deputy general counsel in a blog post at the time. “We not only want to comply with the law, but also go beyond our obligations to build new and improved privacy experiences for everyone on Facebook.”

Nonetheless, in response to complaints, the Irish Data Protection Commission has begun an investigation of the company’s privacy practices.

“The Irish DPC has received a number of breach notifications from Facebook since the introduction of the GDPR on May 25, 2018,” spokesperson for the watchdog said on Friday in an email to The Register. “With reference to these data breaches, including the breach in question, we have this week commenced a statutory inquiry examining Facebook’s compliance with the relevant provisions of the GDPR.”

Coming shortly after the British Parliament published a trove of Facebook emails about how the ad biz monetizes its user data, the investigation isn’t all that surprising.

The Register asked Facebook how users of the ad network should interpret the photo bug in light of CEO Mark Zuckerberg’s apology following the Cambridge Analytica scandal: “We have a responsibility to protect your data, and if we can’t then we don’t deserve to serve you. ”

We’ve not heard back.

Facebook Wielded Data to Reward, Punish Rivals, Emails Show

Is anyone surprised?

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Facebook Inc. wielded user data like a bargaining chip, providing access when that sharing might encourage people to spend more time on the social network — and imposing strict limits on partners in cases where it saw a potential competitive threat, emails show.

A trove of internal correspondence, published online Wednesday by U.K. lawmakers, provides a look into the ways Facebook bosses, including Chief Executive Officer Mark Zuckerberg, treated information posted by users like a commodity that could be harnessed in service of business goals. Apps were invited to use Facebook’s network to grow, as long as that increased usage of Facebook. Certain competitors, in a list reviewed by Zuckerberg himself, were not allowed to use Facebook’s tools and data without his personal sign-off.

In early 2013, Twitter Inc. launched the Vine video-sharing service, which drew on a Facebook tool that let Vine users connect to their Facebook friends. Alerted to the possible competitive threat by an engineer who recommended cutting off Vine’s access to Facebook data, Zuckerberg replied succinctly: “Yup, go for it.”

A spokeswoman for Twitter declined to comment.

In other cases Zuckerberg eloquently espoused the value of giving software developers more access to user data in hopes that it would result in applications that, in turn, would encourage people to do more on Facebook. “We’re trying to enable people to share everything they want, and to do it on Facebook,” Zuckerberg wrote in a November 2012 email. “Sometimes the best way to enable people to share something is to have a developer build a special purpose app or network for that type of content and to make that app social by having Facebook plug into it. However, that may be good for the world but it’s not good for us unless people also share back to Facebook and that content increases the value of our network.”

U.S. Lawmaker Says Facebook Cannot Be Trusted to Regulate Itself

No shit Sherlock

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WASHINGTON — Democratic U.S. Representative David Cicilline, expected to become the next chairman of House Judiciary Committee’s antitrust panel, said on Wednesday that Facebook Inc cannot be trusted to regulate itself and Congress should take action.

Cicilline, citing a report in the New York Times on Facebook’s efforts to deal with a series of crises, said on Twitter: “This staggering report makes clear that @Facebook executives will always put their massive profits ahead of the interests of their customers.”

“It is long past time for us to take action,” he said.

Facebook did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg said a year ago that the company would put its “community” before profit, and it has doubled its staff focused on safety and security issues since then. Spending also has increased on developing automated tools to catch propaganda and material that violates the company’s posting policies.

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“We’ve known for some time that @Facebook chose to turn a blind eye to the spread of hate speech and Russian propaganda on its platform,” said Cicilline, who will likely take the reins of the subcommittee on regulatory reform, commercial and antitrust law when the new, Democratic-controlled Congress is seated in January.

“Now we know that once they knew the truth, top @Facebook executives did everything they could to hide it from the public by using a playbook of suppressing opposition and propagating conspiracy theories,” he said.

“Next January, Congress should get to work enacting new laws to hold concentrated economic power to account, address the corrupting influence of corporate money in our democracy, and restore the rights of Americans,” Cicilline said.

B.S. — Facebook can never put “community” before profits because its that community and the rape of their privacy that is the core Facebook business model. Who they kidding?

‘No Morals’: Advertisers React to Facebook Report

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Several top marketers were openly critical of the tech giant, a day after The New York Times published an investigation detailing how Facebook’s top executives — Mark Zuckerberg and Sheryl Sandberg — made the company’s growth a priority while ignoring and hiding warning signs over how its data and power were being exploited to disrupt elections and spread toxic content. The article also spotlighted a lobbying campaign overseen by Ms. Sandberg, who also oversees advertising, that sought to shift public anger to Facebook’s critics and rival tech firms.

The revelations may be “the straw that breaks the camel’s back,” said Rishad Tobaccowala, chief growth officer for the Publicis Groupe, one of the world’s biggest ad companies. “Now we know Facebook will do whatever it takes to make money. They have absolutely no morals.”

Marketers have grumbled about Facebook in the past, concerned that advertisements could appear next to misinformation and hate speech on the platform. They have complained about how the company handles consumer data and how it measures ads and its user base. But those issues were not enough to outweigh the lure of Facebook’s vast audience and the company’s insistence that it was trying to address its flaws.

And after this article was published online, Mr. Tobaccowala called The New York Times to add to his comments.

“The people there do,” he said, referring to possessing morals, “but as a business, they seem to have lost their compass.”

“So far, the track record basically has been that regardless of what Facebook does, they keep getting more money,” Mr. Tobaccowala said. “The question simply is, will this make people wake up?”

Good question! The stupidity of their user base and the equal stupidity, well actually complicity of their advertisers is a disgrace. What it may take is people to boycott those companies that advertise on Facebook. Maybe in this manner, the final nails can be put into the Facebook coffin.

Facebook Tells Advertisers It Can Reach Many Young People. Too Many

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Facebook faced criticism on Wednesday after an analyst pointed out that the company’s online advertising tools claim they can reach 25 million more young Americans than the United States census says exist.

The analyst, Brian Wieser at Pivotal Research, said in a note Tuesday that Facebook’s Ads Manager says it can potentially reach 41 million 18- to 24-year-olds in the United States and 60 million 25- to 34-year-olds. The catch, according to Mr. Wieser: the census counted just 31 million 18-to-24-year-olds last year and 45 million 25-to-34-year-olds.

“The buyers and marketers I talked to were unaware of this and they are using it for planning purposes,” Mr. Wieser said in an interview. “Buyers are still going to buy from them and plan for them, but this is something that doesn’t need to be an error and puts every other metric they might provide into question.”

The criticism over audience figures comes as Facebook disclosed on Wednesday that hundreds of fake accounts apparently based in Russia had purchased $100,000 worth of political advertising during the American presidential election last year; the tech firm said it had shut down the accounts.

The census figure discrepancy is likely to be a setback for Facebook with advertisers and a boon for outside measurement companies like Nielsen and ComScore, particularly as Facebook vies to make video advertising a bigger part of its business, Mr. Wieser said. Mr. Wieser is one of two analysts with a “sell” rating on Facebook shares, compared to 42 “buy” recommendations and three “hold” ratings, according to data compiled by Bloomberg.

Unethical disgusting company that deserves to be kicked to the curb. Delete your facebook account now.

Facebook targets ads using phone numbers submitted for security purposes

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If you sometimes — or often — wonder how or why you’re seeing a certain ad online, here’s a possible answer.

Most Facebook users know the company targets ads based on information they willingly give the company, but researchers have found that the social media giant also targets ads based on information users may not know is being used to target them — or information they did not explicitly give the company.

For example, phone numbers provided for two-factor authentication are also being used to target ads on Facebook, according to a new report that cites a study, titled “Investigating sources of PII used in Facebook’s targeted advertising,” by researchers from Northeastern and Princeton universities.

When a user gives Facebook a phone number for two-factor authentication or for the purpose of receiving alerts about log-ins, “that phone number became targetable by an advertiser within a couple of weeks,” Gizmodo reported.

A company spokeswoman told Gizmodo that “we use the information people provide to offer a more personalized experience, including showing more relevant ads.” The spokeswoman pointed out that people can set up two-factor authentication without offering their phone numbers.

However, the study also shows — and Gizmodo tested, by successfully targeting an ad at a computer science professor using a landline phone number — that contacts of Facebook users can be targeted without their consent. Facebook users who share their contacts are exposing those contacts to potential ad targeting.

This means that, as a Facebook spokeswoman told Gizmodo, “We understand that in some cases this may mean that another person may not be able to control the contact information someone else uploads about them.”

A Facebook spokeswoman told this news organization Thursday: “We are clear about how we use the information we collect, including the contact information that people upload or add to their own accounts. You can manage and delete the contact information you’ve uploaded at any time.”

In the study, the researchers said Facebook’s use of personally identifiable information in this way is to be expected, given that it’s the business the company is in. “This incentive is exacerbated with the recent introduction of PII-based targeting, which allows advertisers to specify exactly which users to target by specifying a list of their PII,” they said.

Facebook Does it Again! 50 million Facebook accounts breached

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Facebook reset logins for millions of customers last night as it dealt with a data breach that may have exposed nearly 50 million accounts. The breach was caused by an exploit of three bugs in Facebook’s code that were introduced with the addition of a new video uploader in July of 2017. Facebook patched the vulnerabilities on Thursday, and it revoked access tokens for a total of 90 million users

In a call with press today, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg said that the attack targeted the “view as” feature, “code that allowed people to see what other people were seeing when they viewed their profile,” Zuckerberg said. The attackers were able to use this feature, combined with the video uploader feature, to harvest access tokens. A surge in usage of the feature was detected on September 16, triggering the investigation that eventually discovered the breach.

“The attackers did try to query our APIs—but we do not yet know if any private information was exposed,” Zuckerberg said. The attackers used the profile retrieval API, which provides access to the information presented in a user’s profile page, but there’s no evidence yet that Facebook messages or other private data was viewed. No credit card data or other information was exposed, according to Facebook.

Regardless, the breach could do further damage to Facebook’s reputation as the company continues to attempt to regain public trust after a recent string of security and privacy issues. In addition to revelations about the misuse of Facebook user data by Cambridge Analytica during the run-up to the 2016 US presidential election, there have been questions about how Facebook itself uses customer data, including the discovery that Facebook had been routinely collecting full call logs and other data from some mobile users.

And if there were not 100 other reasons to ditch facebook, how about this?

Earlier this week, Facebook acknowledged that it provided phone numbers used for two-factor authentication to advertisers for the purpose of targeting users with advertisements. And Facebook’s Onavo virtual private network application was yanked from Apple’s App Store in August because it was being used by Facebook to collect data about users’ mobile application usage.

Facebook pulls ‘snoopy’ Onavo VPN from Apple’s App Store after falling foul of rules

Just say no to Facebook, they will never change, they can’t, because your private data is their product.

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Facebook has pulled its data-snaffling Onavo VPN from Apple’s App Store after the iGiant said the tech violated recently tightened rules.

Onavo is a free VPN app that pipes user traffic through Facebook systems under the pretext of protecting surfers from malware-tainted websites and other threats. The app, which the social network acquired in 2013, sends users’ data back to Facebook, even when the app is turned off.

Security advocates have blasted Onavo for being a privacy threat, as previously reported. Onavo Protect was separately criticised for allegedly harvesting users’ psychological profiles.

Facebook has been accused of using the data gathered through the app to track rivals and provide pointers on new product development. Data from Onavo lit the way for its 2014 purchase of WhatsApp as well as the social network’s excursion into live video in 2016.

Apple updated its App Store guidelines in June to ban “[collecting] information about which other apps are installed on a user’s device for the purposes of analytics or advertising/marketing”. Apple also informed Facebook that Onavo violated developer rules that prevent apps from using data beyond what’s needed to deliver the service on offer, The Wall Street Journal reported