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Trump Scandal? Ooops..Hackers target The Donald’s businesses

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The FBI and CIA are investigating an attempted hack on the Trump Organization.

According to a report from ABC citing unnamed officials with the intelligence agencies, it is believed someone overseas attempted to breach the President’s international real estate holding company.

The report claims that officials and cybersecurity specialists with both the FBI and CIA met earlier this month with Eric and Donald Trump Jr, who have been running the Trump Organization since their father assumed the Presidency of the United States in January.

The report did not suggest where the hackers may have originated. The Trump Organization has denied any of its data was compromised.

“We absolutely weren’t hacked,” Eric Trump said. “That’s crazy. We weren’t hacked, I can tell you that.”

According to ABC, the meeting took place on May 9th, one day before Trump caused a political firestorm by firing FBI director James Comey in the midst of his investigation into Russian government-backed hackers meddling in the 2016 US election, which saw Trump score a surprise win.

In the months following the election, the FBI and Congress have launched investigations into just how much (if anything) the Trump campaign knew of the Russian meddling.

This is not the first time the Trump Organization has been targeted for cybercrime. First in 2015 and again in 2016, hackers managed to get malware onto the point of sale systems at several Trump hotels.

Those incidents were entirely financial, however, as the attackers were looking to steal the payment card numbers of restaurant customers and hotel guests. This latest incident, given the interest taken by the FBI and CIA, could well have involved a more serious target

Democrats draft laws in futile attempt to protect US internet privacy

At a the the present, I agree that this has a snowball’s chance in hell. But if more states take it seriously, just maybe it will negate the disgusting screwing of Internet users privacy by big corporate ISPs with their bidding done by their lackies in the congress, chief FCC lackie Pai and signed by the poorest excuse for a leader in years, Trump.

Hah Hah – Drain the swamp. What a joke. Just filled it with swine dung and does it wreak worse than it ever did. Hey maybe I show start a new category “swine swamp.”

Oh, do I sound angry? God damn right I am.

Less than a week after President Trump signed the law allowing ISPs to sell customers’ browsing habits to advertisers, Democratic politicians are introducing bills to stop the practice.

On Thursday, Senator Ed Markey (D-MA) submitted a bill [PDF] that would enshrine the FCC privacy rules proposed during the Obama administration into law – the rules just shot down by the Trump administration. Americans would have to opt in to allowing ISPs to sell their browsing data under the proposed legislation, and ISPs would have to take greater care to protect their servers from hacking attacks.

“Thanks to Congressional Republicans, corporations, not consumers, are in control of sensitive information about Americans’ health, finances, and children. The Republican roll-back of strong broadband privacy rules means ISP no longer stands for Internet Service Provider, it stands for ‘Information Sold for Profit’,” said Senator Markey.

“This legislation will put the rules back on the books to protect consumers from abusive invasions of their privacy. Americans should not have to forgo their fundamental right to privacy just because their homes and phones are connected to the internet.”

The bill has been cosponsored by ten senators, all Democrats except for the independent Bernie Sanders. No Republicans have added their name to the legislation – nor shown any support for it – which probably means it’s doomed to failure given the GOP-dominated composition of the Senate.

The new bill echoes similar legislation introduced in the House of Representatives earlier in the week. Representative Jacky Rosen, who was a software developer before she got into politics, has introduced the Restoring American Privacy Act of 2017.

“As someone who has first-hand experience as a computer programmer, I know that keeping privacy protections in place is essential for safeguarding vulnerable and sensitive data from hackers,” said Representative Rosen (D-NV).

“I will not stand by and let corporations get access to the most intimate parts of people’s lives without them knowing and without consent. It is appalling that Republicans and President Trump would be in favor of taking Americans’ most personal information to sell it to the highest bidder.”

The FCC rules would have required internet users to sign up to allow their browsing histories to be sold, and put an increased onus on ISPs to protect their private data. One of the first acts of the new administration was to drop the FCC rules and legislate against them, with President Trump signing off on the legislation on Monday.

Facing a public backlash, the major ISPs have promised that they won’t sell off an individual’s browsing history – but left the door open for selling the data as part of a group. Customers will also have the choice to opt out, but you can bet the form to do so will be in the internet equivalent of a locked filing cabinet carrying a sign reading “Beware of the leopard.”

The bills will be welcomed by many but, realistically, have no chance of passing unless a sizable number of Republicans cross the floor. That’s not going to happen, so individual states have been taking action of their own.

Last week, Minnesota and Illinois legislatures began enacting legislation to provide privacy protections for internet users, and now New York has done the same. Senator Tim Kennedy (D-Buffalo) has introduced legislation to stop ISPs selling off their customers’ browsing histories.

“When voters across the country elected this House and US Senate last November, I doubt they were voting with the hope that their ISP would be allowed to sell their browsing history,” said Senator Kennedy.

“This kind of anti-consumer, anti-privacy action doesn’t benefit anyone except large corporations. This is not an abstract threat to regular folks – this is bad policy with real-world consequences.”

It’s possible the ISPs could have bitten off more than they can chew on this one by seriously underestimating quite how angry this issue has made people. Despite frantic PR moves, more and more states are now taking matters into their own hands – which is just as the Founding Fathers designed the system.

SOURCE: HERE

Corrupt Politician Signs Bill Recinding America’s digital privacy protections while Grunting

Oh and of course he said he was “for the little guy right.” Bullshit. Oink Oink Grunt Grunt.

So let’s do some work via the Register

Ajit Pai, the chief lackie…eerhh, chairman of the FCC, said

“resident Trump and Congress have appropriately invalidated one part of the Obama-era plan for regulating the Internet. Those flawed privacy rules, which never went into effect, were designed to benefit one group of favored companies, not online consumers.”

BULLSHIT on the last part of that sentence, that the rules were “designed to benefit one group of favored companies, not online consumers.”

The rules were developed entirely and absolutely to protect online consumers. They required ISPs to get an opt-in from customers for sensitive information, to offer an opt-out for other uses of that data, and to ensure that they appropriately protected that data.


The other Republican commissioner on the FCC, Mike O’Rielly, had his own statement that, unfortunately, layered bullshit upon bullshit.

“I applaud President Trump and Congress for utilizing the CRA to undo the FCC’s detrimental privacy rules,” he said. “The parade of horribles trotted out to scare the American people about its passage are completely fictitious, especially since parts of the rules never even went into effect. Hopefully, we will soon return to a universe where thoughtful privacy protections are not overrun by shameful FCC power grabs and blatant misrepresentations.”

What O’Rielly does, however, is pinpoint the beating heart of the bullshit: the claim that since something hasn’t happened yet, it means that it won’t happen.

For someone who is a commissioner at a federal regulator, this willful blindness over how the real world works is borderline obnoxious.

Here is the absolute solid reality of what this decision to scrap the FCC rules means:

ISPs were previously able to do what they can do now, ie, sell their customers’ private data.
But they were previously at risk of being investigated by the FTC and then, later, the FCC.
If they had been found to have broken data privacy rules, they faced huge fines and most likely the requirement to get prior approval from the FTC/FCC before doing anything similar in future.
Now, however, there is no backstop. The FTC does not have jurisdiction. And nor does the FCC. The ISPs currently exist in a regulatory-free world.

What this means is significant and it is the source of (Democrat) claims that ISPs will soon be selling your private data and the counter-claims (by Republicans) that people are fear-mongering and inventing problems. Source: Here

Swine — oh wait, that is unfair…to the the swine I mean.