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Click this link (don’t fret, nothing malicious). Chances are your browser displays “apple.com” in the address bar. What about this one? Goes to “epic.com,” right?

Wrong. They are in fact carefully crafted but entirely legitimate domains in non-English languages that are designed to look exactly the same as common English words. The real domains for the two above links are: xn--80ak6aa92e.com and xn--e1awd7f.com.

In quick testing by El Reg, Chrome 57 on Windows 10 and macOS 10.12, and Firefox 52 on macOS, display apple.com and epic.com rather than the actual domains. We’re told Chrome 57 and Firefox 52 are vulnerable while Safari and Internet Explorer are in the clear. Bleeding-edge Chrome 60 on macOS 10.12 was not vulnerable.

This domain disguising, which tricks people into visiting a site they think is legit but really isn’t, is called a “homograph attack” – and we were supposed to have fixed it more than a decade ago when the exact same problem was noticed with respect to the address “paypal.com.”

So what is this, how does it work, and why does it still exist?

Well, thanks to the origins of the internet in the United States, the global network’s addressing systems were only designed to handle English – or, more accurately, the classic Western keyboard and computer ASCII text.

The limitations of this approach became apparent very soon after people in other countries started using the domain name system and there was no way to represent their language.

And so a lengthy and often embarrassingly tone-deaf effort was undertaken by largely American engineers to resolve this by assigning ASCII-based codes to specific symbols. Unicode became “Punycode.”

PS: To fix the issue with Chrome, wait for Chrome 58 to arrive around April 25 and install it. On Firefox, Firefox Mobile, and Seamonkey, go to about:config and set network.IDN_show_punycode to true.