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Browser will block third-party software from mucking around with pages next year.

By mid-2018 Google Chrome will no longer allow outside applications – cough, cough, antivirus packages – to run code within the browser on Windows.

“In the past, this software needed to inject code in Chrome in order to function properly; unfortunately, users with software that injects code into Windows Chrome are 15 per cent more likely to experience crashes.”

In particular, the target here seems to be poorly coded AV tools can not only crash the browser or cause slowdowns, but also introduce security vulnerabilities of their own for hackers to exploit.

Rather than accept injected code, Chrome will require applications to use either Native Messaging API calls or Chrome extensions to add functionality to the browser. Google believes both methods can be used to retain features without having to risk browser crashes. With Chrome 68, the browser will block third-party code in all cases except when the blocking itself would cause a crash. In that case, Chrome will reload, allow the code to run, and then give the user a warning that the third-party software will need to be removed for Chrome to run properly. The warning will be removed and nearly all code injection will be disabled in January of 2019.

“While most software that injects code into Chrome will be affected by these changes, there are some exceptions,” said Hamilton.

“Microsoft-signed code, accessibility software, and IME software will not be affected.”