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The stomach-churning love-fest between the American cable industry and FCC Ajit Pai continues apace with Big Cable now pillow talking the federal regulator into how to prevent individual US states forming their own net neutrality protections.

Pai is expecting to call for a vote on dismantling net neutrality rules on December 14 – despite widespread opposition to the idea – but cable companies are worried that state legislators will simply write their own laws to effectively reintroduce them.

And so, joining a determined campaign by cable giants Verizon and Comcast to lobby against such actions, the wireless comms trade association CTIA has joined the fray, sending a letter to the FCC informing it how it can usurp such state efforts.

The CTIA even has its own simple anecdote to explain why it makes sense for the FCC to set the rules across the entire US: a train journey.

“A passenger riding on Amtrak between Washington D.C. and New York City travels through five different jurisdictions during the course of a 3.5-hour trip,” the letter argued. “If each of these jurisdictions were permitted to enforce its own rules regarding (for example) traffic prioritization, the rider’s mobile broadband usage during the trip would be subject to five different legal regimes, even if the rider spent the entire trip watching a single movie. This would be impracticable, and only underscores the risks inherent in a patchwork quilt of broadband regulation.”

The argument is, of course, gibberish: internet users pull content from all over the world every second of every day with it passing through hundreds of jurisdictions. And yet somehow the internet continues to function. How? Because internet traffic is not road or rail traffic.

Whether Pai and the other FCC commissioners are able to see through such obvious, false manipulation or get seduced by the appeal to their own importance, we will have to see. Or perhaps the bigger question: how far is Pai willing to go to please the cable industry? And is he prepared to make a fool of himself doing so? Infatuation is a difficult thing to judge.