Skip to content

Social Media Privacy

Facebook needs to be regulated more tightly, or broken up so that no single entity controls all of its data

Quote

The message was clear: The company just wanted negative stories to stop. It didn’t really care how the data was used.

Facebook knows what you look like, your location, who your friends are, your interests, if you’re in a relationship or not, and what other pages you look at on the web. This data allows advertisers to target the more than one billion Facebook visitors a day. It’s no wonder the company has ballooned in size to a $500 billion behemoth in the five years since its I.P.O.

The more data it has on offer, the more value it creates for advertisers. That means it has no incentive to police the collection or use of that data — except when negative press or regulators are involved. Facebook is free to do almost whatever it wants with your personal information, and has no reason to put safeguards in place.

For a few years, Facebook’s developer platform hosted a thriving ecosystem of popular social games. Remember the age of Farmville and Candy Crush? The premise was simple: Users agreed to give game developers access to their data in exchange for free use of addictive games.

..

In one instance, a developer appeared to be using Facebook data to automatically generate profiles of children, without their consent. When I called the company responsible for the app, it claimed that Facebook’s policies on data use were not being violated, but we had no way to confirm whether that was true. Once data passed from the platform to a developer, Facebook had no view of the data or control over it. In other cases, developers asked for permission to get user data that their apps obviously didn’t need — such as a social game asking for all of your photos and messages. People rarely read permissions request forms carefully, so they often authorize access to sensitive information without realizing it.

At a company that was deeply concerned about protecting its users, this situation would have been met with a robust effort to cut off developers who were making questionable use of data. But when I was at Facebook, the typical reaction I recall looked like this: try to put any negative press coverage to bed as quickly as possible, with no sincere efforts to put safeguards in place or to identify and stop abusive developers. When I proposed a deeper audit of developers’ use of Facebook’s data, one executive asked me, “Do you really want to see what you’ll find?”

The message was clear: The company just wanted negative stories to stop. It didn’t really care how the data was used.

This makes for a dangerous mix: a company that reaches most of the country every day and has the most detailed set of personal data ever assembled, but has no incentive to prevent abuse. Facebook needs to be regulated more tightly, or broken up so that no single entity controls all of its data. The company won’t protect us by itself, and nothing less than our democracy is at stake.

Indeed. And users, including businesses, need to get serious about privacy and the damage the likes of facebook are doing and flee Facebook and their ilk in droves. Will this happen? I doubt it. As long as it is free they will come. As the increased popularity of Alexa, and other personal assistants that listen in shows, people are continuing to invite these modern forms of big brother into their private lives.

Russian Influence Reached 126 Million Through Facebook Alone

Quote

Russian agents intending to sow discord among American citizens disseminated inflammatory posts that reached 126 million users on Facebook, published more than 131,000 messages on Twitter and uploaded over 1,000 videos to Google’s YouTube service, according to copies of prepared remarks from the companies that were obtained by The New York Times.

The new information goes far beyond what the companies have revealed in the past and underline the breadth of the Kremlin’s efforts to lever open divisions in the United States using American technology platforms, especially Facebook. Multiple investigations of Russian meddling have loomed over the first 10 months of the Trump presidency, with one leading to the indictments of Paul Manafort, the former Trump campaign chief, and others on Monday.

For Facebook, Google and Twitter, the discovery of Russian influence by way of their sites has been a rude awakening. The companies had long positioned themselves as spreading information and connecting people for positive ends. Now the companies must grapple with how Russian agents used their technologies exactly as they were meant to be used — but for malevolent purposes.

Rude Awaking? Bullshit. For whom? Connecting people for positive good? More bullshit! It is about hoovering up personal user data and selling it! Come on, wake up!

Just say no to Social Media. Just say no to Google. Demand privacy.

Corrupt Politician Signs Bill Recinding America’s digital privacy protections while Grunting

Oh and of course he said he was “for the little guy right.” Bullshit. Oink Oink Grunt Grunt.

So let’s do some work via the Register

Ajit Pai, the chief lackie…eerhh, chairman of the FCC, said

“resident Trump and Congress have appropriately invalidated one part of the Obama-era plan for regulating the Internet. Those flawed privacy rules, which never went into effect, were designed to benefit one group of favored companies, not online consumers.”

BULLSHIT on the last part of that sentence, that the rules were “designed to benefit one group of favored companies, not online consumers.”

The rules were developed entirely and absolutely to protect online consumers. They required ISPs to get an opt-in from customers for sensitive information, to offer an opt-out for other uses of that data, and to ensure that they appropriately protected that data.


The other Republican commissioner on the FCC, Mike O’Rielly, had his own statement that, unfortunately, layered bullshit upon bullshit.

“I applaud President Trump and Congress for utilizing the CRA to undo the FCC’s detrimental privacy rules,” he said. “The parade of horribles trotted out to scare the American people about its passage are completely fictitious, especially since parts of the rules never even went into effect. Hopefully, we will soon return to a universe where thoughtful privacy protections are not overrun by shameful FCC power grabs and blatant misrepresentations.”

What O’Rielly does, however, is pinpoint the beating heart of the bullshit: the claim that since something hasn’t happened yet, it means that it won’t happen.

For someone who is a commissioner at a federal regulator, this willful blindness over how the real world works is borderline obnoxious.

Here is the absolute solid reality of what this decision to scrap the FCC rules means:

ISPs were previously able to do what they can do now, ie, sell their customers’ private data.
But they were previously at risk of being investigated by the FTC and then, later, the FCC.
If they had been found to have broken data privacy rules, they faced huge fines and most likely the requirement to get prior approval from the FTC/FCC before doing anything similar in future.
Now, however, there is no backstop. The FTC does not have jurisdiction. And nor does the FCC. The ISPs currently exist in a regulatory-free world.

What this means is significant and it is the source of (Democrat) claims that ISPs will soon be selling your private data and the counter-claims (by Republicans) that people are fear-mongering and inventing problems. Source: Here

Swine — oh wait, that is unfair…to the the swine I mean.

The House voted to wipe away the FCC’s Internet privacy protections

SJ 34 would repeal safeguards that prohibit Internet service providers (ISPs) from sharing data, such as e-mails and web history, with third parties without user consent. It would also do away with transparency requirements, which mandate that ISPs provide easily accessible privacy notices to customers and advanced notice prior to changes…..Assuming Trump signs the measure, Internet providers will be freed from those obligations, which would otherwise have taken effect later this year. With this data, Internet providers can sell highly targeted ads, making them rivals to Google and Facebook, analysts say.

Internet providers also will be free to use customer data in other ways, such as selling the information directly to data brokers that target lucrative or vulnerable demographics.

“ISPs like Comcast, AT&T, and Charter will be free to sell your personal information to the highest bidder without your permission — and no one will be able to protect you,” wrote Gigi Sohn, a former FCC staffer who helped draft the privacy rules, in a recent blog post on the Verge.

Selling your data is merely one of the four ways in which Internet providers intend to make money off consumers. The others include selling you access to the Internet, as they have traditionally done; selling access to media content they’ve acquired by purchasing large entertainment companies; and selling advertising that directly targets you based on the data the provider has collected by watching how you use the Internet and what content you consume.

Sources: The Hill, Washington Post

Here is the roll call Miscreants who voted to repeal. Source Senate.Gov

Miscreants who voted For BillVoted AgainstNot Voting
Alexander (R-TN)Baldwin (D-WI)sakson (R-GA)
Barrasso (R-WY)Bennet (D-CO)Paul (R-KY)
Blunt (R-MO)Blumenthal (D-CT)
Boozman (R-AR)Booker (D-NJ)
Burr (R-NC)Brown (D-OH)
Capito (R-WV)Cantwell (D-WA)
Cassidy (R-LA)Cardin (D-MD)
Cochran (R-MS)Carper (D-DE)
Collins (R-ME)Casey (D-PA)
Corker (R-TN)Coons (D-DE)
Cornyn (R-TX)Cortez Masto (D-NV)
Cotton (R-AR)Donnelly (D-IN)
Crapo (R-ID)Duckworth (D-IL)
Cruz (R-TX)Durbin (D-IL)
Daines (R-MT)Feinstein (D-CA)
Enzi (R-WY)Franken (D-MN)
Ernst (R-IA)Gillibrand (D-NY)
Fischer (R-NE)Harris (D-CA)
Flake (R-AZ)Hassan (D-NH)
Gardner (R-CO)Heinrich (D-NM)
Graham (R-SC)Heitkamp (D-ND)
Grassley (R-IA)Hirono (D-HI)
Hatch (R-UT)Kaine (D-VA)
Heller (R-NV)King (I-ME)
Hoeven (R-ND)Klobuchar (D-MN)
Inhofe (R-OK)Leahy (D-VT)
Johnson (R-WI)Manchin (D-WV)
Kennedy (R-LA)Markey (D-MA)
Lankford (R-OK)McCaskill (D-MO)
Lee (R-UT)Menendez (D-NJ)
McCain (R-AZ)Merkley (D-OR)
McConnell (R-KY)Murphy (D-CT)
Moran (R-KS)Murray (D-WA)
Murkowski (R-AK)Nelson (D-FL)
Perdue (R-GA)Peters (D-MI)
Portman (R-OH)Reed (D-RI)
Risch (R-ID)Sanders (I-VT)
Roberts (R-KS)Schatz (D-HI)
Rounds (R-SD)Schumer (D-NY)
Rubio (R-FL)Shaheen (D-NH)
Sasse (R-NE)Stabenow (D-MI)
Scott (R-SC)Tester (D-MT)
Shelby (R-AL)Udall (D-NM)
Strange (R-AL)Van Hollen (D-MD)
Sullivan (R-AK)Warner (D-VA)
Thune (R-SD)Warren (D-MA)
Tillis (R-NC)Whitehouse (D-RI)
Toomey (R-PA)Wyden (D-OR)
Wicker (R-MS)
Young (R-IN)

Cloud Pets! Your Family & Intimate Messages exposed to all sorts of Miscreants

… Now I know the average parent spends a good deal their time on Facebook and other “look at me .. look at me” social media and can care less about such hard to understand things like I.T. Security.

BUT THESE ARE YOUR CHILDREN AND YOU NEED TO PROTECT THEM!

…sorry, as a parent, this stuff makes my blood boil. Look parents, you scour the pedophile databases for your neighborhood, but leave the barn door open on the Internet. If you think governmental entities are going to protect you, you are only fooling yourselves. Companies peddling these things are about making the maximum amount of money at the lowest possible cost. They will **NOT** invest in expensive and complex security. Why? they do not have to. By the time the breach is discovered, they have made there millions. And there is absolutely no teeth in any governmental mandates op provide security such that any really exist in the first place.

Ok, on with the story!

The personal information of more than half a million people who bought internet-connected fluffy animals has been compromised.

The details, which include email addresses and passwords, were leaked along with access to profile pictures and more than 2m voice recordings of children and adults who had used the CloudPets stuffed toys.

The US company’s toys can connect over Bluetooth to an app to allow a parent to upload or download audio messages for their child.

Of course the company denied it and shot at the messenger

CloudPets’s chief executive, Mark Myers, denied that voice recordings were stolen in a statement to NetworkWorld magazine. “Were voice recordings stolen? Absolutely not.” He added: “The headlines that say 2m messages were leaked on the internet are completely false.” Myers also told NetworkWorld that when Motherboard raised the issue with CloudPets, “we looked at it and thought it was a very minimal issue”. Myers added that a hacker would only be able to access the sound recordings if they managed to guess the password. When the Guardian tried to contact Myers on Tuesday, emails to CloudPets’s official contact address were returned as undeliverable.

Troy Hunt, owner of data breach monitoring service Have I Been Pwned, drew attention to the breach, which he first became aware of in mid-February. At that point, more than half a million records were being traded online. Hunt’s own source had first attempted to contact CloudPets in late December, but also received no response. While the database had been connected to the internet, it had more than 800,000 user records in it, suggesting that the data dump Hunt received is just a fraction of the full information potentially stolen.

The personal information was contained in a database connected directly to the internet, with no usernames or passwords preventing any visitor from accessing all the data. A week after Hunt’s contact first attempted to alert CloudPets, the original databases were deleted, and a ransom demand was left, and a week after that, no remaining databases were publicly accessible. CloudPets has not notified users of the hack.

Hunt argues the security flaws should undercut the entire premise of connected toys. “It only takes one little mistake on behalf of the data custodian – such as misconfiguring the database security – and every single piece of data they hold on you and your family can be in the public domain in mere minutes.

“If you’re fine with your kids’ recordings ending up in unexpected places then so be it, but that’s the assumption you have to work on because there’s a very real chance it’ll happen. There’s no doubt whatsoever in my mind that there are many other connected toys out there with serious security vulnerabilities in the services that sit behind them. Inevitably, some would already have been compromised and the data taken without the knowledge of the manufacturer or parents.”

John Madelin, CEO at IT security experts RelianceACSN, echoes Hunt’s warnings. “Connected toys that are easily accessible by hackers are sinister. The CloudPets issue highlights the fact that manufacturers of connected devices really struggle to bake security in from the start. The 2.2m voice recordings were stored online, but not securely, along with email addresses and passwords of 800,000 users, this is unforgivable.”  Source: Guardian Article Here

Now for the technical, here are some tid-bits from the researcher. Full article here

Clearly, CloudPets weren’t just ignoring my contact, they simply weren’t even reading their emails”

There are references to almost 2.2 million voice recordings of parents and their children exposed by databases that should never have contained production data.

But then I dug a little deeper and took a look at the mobile app:

CloudPets app

This app communicates with a website at spiraltoys.s.mready.net which is on a domain owned by Romanian company named mReady. That URL is bound to a server with IP address 45.79.147.159, the exact same address the exposed databases were on. That’s a production website there too because it’s the one the mobile app is hitting so in other words, the test and staging databases along with the production website were all sitting on the one box. The most feasible explanation I can come up with for this is that one of those databases is being used for production purposes and the other non-production (a testing environment, for example).

Ghostery – Bad Design

I am constantly evaluating browser add-ons and recently took a harder look at Ghostery. I notice that settings could not be saved when I closed the browser and then restarted. Why? Well it seems that Ghostery stores these in a cookie.

What a Cookie? Shame Shame Shame. **ALL** browsers should be set to dump cache and all cookies when you close it. Why? It helps greatly to prevent tracking and those targeted adverts among others.

What to use instead? A good and efficient ad-blocker. like uBlock I am also using uBlock Origin which appears to have a wider feature set and extra privacy settings. Both can be downloaded from your favorite browser ad-ons facility. Here are a few: Firefox is here, Chrome (yuk- you are google’s product, but if you insist) is here. Safari – not on their site, but uBlock is here. I cannot find the download for uBlock Origin. Post comment with link if you know it.

Direct uBlock Origin releases are here, but they may not be verify by the browser yet.

Nick

Trump: Blame the Computers not Russia

Trump: “I think we ought to get on with our lives. I think that computers have complicated lives very greatly. The whole age of computer has made it where nobody knows exactly what is going on. We have speed, we have a lot of other things, but I’m not sure we have the kind the security we need,” Trump said according to press pool report. He was at the Mar-a-Lago resort at the time of making the statement.” Source

Actually, I agree with Trump on this. We do not have the security we need. More fundamental to that, we do not have a mindset that puts computer security first. We bolt the front door and secure our physical premises with 24/7 monitoring services, yet we leave the barn door wide open for our online presence be it email, social media, browsing and shopping.

Privacy and security is an option when in fact it should come first. Imagine if the internet was built from the ground up with privacy and security as the foundation layer? That would mean no web bugs, tracking cookies, targeted advertising, privacy statements like Netflix’s (for example) that say, let me rape you and sell my experience and if you do not agree, your option is to cancel your subscription.

And home router manufacturers that make appliances so easily hacked it is a joke. And Microsoft windows that to this day facilitates users running with administrator privileges in everyday use. And the IoT – internet of things that have little if any security. And the mindset of the average consumer the allows Amazon’s Alexa into their home. Completely secure, right? Yeah sure, Why then, I ask, did this happen: “Amazon had been served with a search warrant in a murder case, as detectives in Bentonville, Ark., want to know what Alexa heard in the early morning hours of Nov. 22, 2015 — when Victor Collins was found dead in a hot tub behind a home after an Arkansas Razorbacks football game. (Read more) Come on! Lock the door, arm yourself to the teeth, **but** let a device with 7 microphones listening to every sound in your house connected to ?? and easily hacked by ?? (you’ll never know!). By the way, the same goes with Siri and Google voice on your smart phones.

Don’t blame the Russians, blame yourself. Yes, the mindset needs to change indeed.

Happy New Year.

Surprise! Magic Kinder app could let hackers send vids to your kids

Quote

Security watchers have warned of massive privacy problems with the Magic Kinder App for children.

A lack of encryption within the Magic Kinder smartphone app and other security shortcomings open the doors for all sorts of exploits, they claim.

Hacktive Security alleges that a malicious user could “read the chat of the children, send them messages, photographs and videos or change user profile info such as date of birth and gender,” as explained in detail in a blog post here.

The Android app – which has clocked in at more than 500,000 downloads – was developed by a subsidiary of Ferrero International, the firm behind Nutella, Kinder and Ferrero Rocher.

The mobile software aims to offer “strategic, educational games and quizzes to improve children’s skills and development”.

Ferrero has yet to respond to a request for comment.

Joe Bursell, marketing manager at independent security consultancy Pen Test Partners, said that the app Magic Kinder App is riddled with basic security problems.

“These are not subtle, hard-to-find issues,” Bursell told El Reg. “You’d see those IDs in the proxy within minutes of testing and the first thing you would do is manually increment/decrement them.”

“There are no authorisation checks on any of the requests. This means that anyone can: send a message to your kids, read your family diary, and change other data about people, e.g. gender.”

“Also, it doesn’t use encryption,” Bursell added.

Probably laden with spyware to hoover up all sorts family data.

 

France attacks Facebook data tracking, opening new front in privacy battles

facebook big brother
Quote

French data regulators have given Facebook three months to stop transferring data on French users to the US and to refrain from tracking nonusers.

PARIS — In yet another fissure between the US and Europe over digital privacy practices, French regulators ordered Facebook to curtail its online data collection practices.

The country’s data protection authority, known by its French acronym CNIL, ruled this week to give Facebook three months to stop transferring data on French users to the states and to refrain from collecting information about nonusers, or else face hefty fines.

—–
There is an easier solution. Just stop using it. These slime balls track you whether you are a user or not. That said, anyone who disrespects their own privacy deserves what they get. Word of the day Insouciant -“Marked by blithe unconcern; nonchalant.” And it is not just users of Facebook and other social media, it is what we witness everyday in businesses when it comes to their IT security and their employee and customer’s privacy.