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Monthly Archives: August 2017

HOTSPOT VPN == Spyware

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Hotspot Shield VPN throws your privacy in the fire, injects ads, JS into browsers – claim
CDT tries to set fed trade watchdog on internet biz
By Thomas Claburn in San Francisco 7 Aug 2017 at 20:20

The Center for Democracy & Technology (CDT), a digital rights advocacy group, on Monday urged US federal trade authorities to investigate VPN provider AnchorFree for deceptive and unfair trade practices.

AnchorFree claims its Hotspot Shield VPN app protects netizens from online tracking, but, according to a complaint filed with the FTC, the company’s software gathers data and its privacy policy allows it to share the information.

Worryingly, it is claimed the service forces ads and JavaScript code into people’s browsers when connected through Hotspot Shield: “The VPN has been found to be actively injecting JavaScript codes using iframes for advertising and tracking purposes.”

“Hotspot Shield tells customers that their privacy and security are ‘guaranteed’ but their actual practices starkly contradict this,” said Michelle De Mooy, Director of CDT’s Privacy & Data Project, in a statement. “They are sharing sensitive information with third party advertisers and exposing users’ data to leaks or outside attacks.”

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IP address and unique device identifiers are generally considered to be private personal information, but AnchorFree’s Privacy Policy explicitly exempts this data from its definition of Personal Information.

“Contrary to Hotspot Shield’s claims, the VPN has been found to be actively injecting JavaScript codes using iFrames for advertising and tracking purposes,” the complaint says, adding that the VPN uses more than five different third-party tracking libraries.

What’s the alternative? Rool your own, set up a VPS or Algo or both

Robocalls Flooding Your Cellphone? Here’s How to Stop Them

So here is a New York Times article on the subject. There are a few good ideas, but another layer is to always block your caller id and only unblock it for contacts you trust. Here is the FULL ARTICLE, but I summarize below

Rule No. 1 The most simple and effective remedy is to not answer numbers you don’t know, Mr. Quilici said.

“Just interacting with these calls is just generally a mistake,” he said.

If you do answer, don’t respond to the invitation to press a number to opt out. That will merely verify that yours is a working number and make you a target for more calls, experts said.

List your phones on the National Do Not Call Registry and report them there!

Use apps such as Truecaller, RoboKiller (fee), Mr. Number (owned by Hiya<below>), Nomorobo (free for landlines, fee for mobile) and Hiya (fee??), which will block the calls.  (Note: I have not reviewed any of these for security issues, so caveat emptor)

Phone companies, such as T-Mobile, Verizon and AT&T, also have tools to combat robocalls. They work by blocking calls from numbers known to be problematic  (Note: Oh yea, after being going through 10 minutes of voice response and being on hold for another 20 minutes)

Turn the tables And then there is the Jolly Roger Telephone Company, which turns the tables on telemarketers. This program allows a customer to put the phone on mute and patch telemarketing calls to a robot, which understands speech patterns and inflections and works to keep the caller engaged.  (Note – I kind of like this idea, but many of these miscreants use fake caller IDs of legitimate business phone numbers. Also note, the services is NOT free, but not that expensive either for that matter.)

 

Police say fridges could be turned into listening devices

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Just say NO to IOT

Your fridge could be turned into a covert listening device by Queensland Police conducting surveillance.

The revelation was made during a Parliamentary committee hearing on proposed legislation to give police more powers to combat terrorism.

Police Commissioner Ian Stewart said technology was rapidly changing and police and security agencies could use devices already in place, and turn them into listening devices.

“It is not outside the realm that, if you think about the connected home that we now look at quite regularly where people have their security systems, their CCTV systems and their computerised refrigerator all hooked up wirelessly, you could actually turn someone’s fridge into a listening device,” Mr Stewart said.

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Queensland Police Commissioner Ian Stewart said the proposed new laws were necessary to keep people safe.
Queensland Police Commissioner Ian Stewart said the proposed new laws were necessary to keep people safe. Photo: Glenn Hunt

“This is the type of challenge that law enforcement is facing in trying to keep pace with events and premises where terrorists may be planning, they may be gathering to discuss deployment in a tactical way and they may be building devices in that place.

“All of that is taken into account by these new proposed laws.”

The Counter-Terrorism and Other Legislation Amendment bill would give police more powers during and following attacks.