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Monthly Archives: February 2017

Bonk Detecting WiFi Mattress

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Researchers James Scott and Drew Spaniel point out in their report Rise of the Machines: The Dyn Attack Was Just a Practice Run [PDF] that IoT represents a threat that is only beginning to be understood.

The pair say the risk that regulation could stifle market-making IoT innovation (like the WiFi cheater-detection mattress) is outweighed by the need to stop feeding Shodan.

“National IoT regulation and economic incentives that mandate security-by-design are worthwhile as best practices, but regulation development faces the challenge of … security-by-design without stifling innovation, and remaining actionable, implementable and binding,” Scott and Spaniel say.

“Regulation on IoT devices by the United States will influence global trends and economies in the IoT space, because every stakeholder operates in the United States, works directly with United States manufacturers, or relies on the United States economy.

“Nonetheless, IoT regulation will have a limited impact on reducing IoT DDoS attacks as the United States government only has limited direct influence on IoT manufacturers and because the United States is not even in the top 10 countries from which malicious IoT traffic originates.” …


I have two comments:

To think any agency could actually do this correctly is laughable given complexity and the track record of the gov. Hey they cannot even stop the robo calls from the likes “Card Redemption Services” The trove of treasure, additionally, to be gained from leaks is far too valuable to both gov. and industry to limit it with some solid standard.

But the Wifi Mattress idea may have legs (4 of them at least…) A Wifi enabled mattress — why with the addition of an accelerometer and a gui for to put in your social media credentials – well then your bedroom gymnastics can be posted instantly to your facebook page. A whole new level in selfies! (..or as I to call it the “look at me, look at me mommy” website that dumps all your info in the hungry jaws of advertisers)

My Friend Cayla

…Or is it My Friend Spy Cayla. And what is the difference between this and Google Voice and Siri? Not much.

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The My Friend Cayla doll has been shown in the past to be hackable

An official watchdog in Germany has told parents to destroy a talking doll called Cayla because its smart technology can reveal personal data.

The warning was issued by the Federal Network Agency (Bundesnetzagentur), which oversees telecommunications.

Researchers say hackers can use an unsecure bluetooth device embedded in the toy to listen and talk to the child playing with it.

But the UK Toy Retailers Association said Cayla “offers no special risk”.

In a statement sent to the BBC, the TRA also said “there is no reason for alarm”.

The Vivid Toy group, which distributes My Friend Cayla, has previously said that examples of hacking were isolated and carried out by specialists. However, it said the company would take the information on board as it was able to upgrade the app used with the doll.

But experts have warned that the problem has not been fixed.

The Cayla doll can respond to a user’s question by accessing the internet. For example, if a child asks the doll “what is a little horse called?” the doll can reply “it’s called a foal”.
Media captionRory Cellan-Jones sees how Cayla, a talking child’s doll, can be hacked to say any number of offensive things.

A vulnerability in Cayla’s software was first revealed in January 2015.

Complaints have been filed by US and EU consumer groups.

The EU Commissioner for Justice, Consumers and Gender Equality, Vera Jourova, told the BBC: “I’m worried about the impact of connected dolls on children’s privacy and safety.”

The Commission is investigating whether such smart dolls breach EU data protection safeguards.

In addition to those concerns, a hack allowing strangers to speak directly to children via the My Friend Cayla doll has been shown to be possible.

The TRA said “we would always expect parents to supervise their children at least intermittently”.

It said the distributor Vivid had “restated that the toy is perfectly safe to own and use when following the user instructions”.
Privacy laws

Under German law, it is illegal to sell or possess a banned surveillance device. A breach of that law can result in a jail term of up to two years, according to German media reports.

Germany has strict privacy laws to protect against surveillance. In the 20th Century Germans experienced abusive surveillance by the state – in Nazi Germany and communist East Germany.

The warning by Germany’s Federal Network Agency came after student Stefan Hessel, from the University of Saarland, raised legal concerns about My Friend Cayla.

Mr Hessel, quoted by the German website Netzpolitik.org, said a bluetooth-enabled device could connect to Cayla’s speaker and microphone system within a radius of 10m (33ft). He said an eavesdropper could even spy on someone playing with the doll “through several walls”.

A spokesman for the federal agency told Sueddeutsche Zeitung daily that Cayla amounted to a “concealed transmitting device”, illegal under an article in German telecoms law (in German).

“It doesn’t matter what that object is – it could be an ashtray or fire alarm,” he explained.

Manufacturer Genesis Toys has not yet commented on the German warning.

Not so Smart using a Smart TV

As reported Vizio’s Smart TVs spied on you

Starting in 2014, Vizio made TVs that automatically tracked what consumers were watching and transmitted that data back to its servers. Vizio even retrofitted older models by installing its tracking software remotely. All of this, the FTC and AG allege, was done without clearly telling consumers or getting their consent.

What did Vizio know about what was going on in the privacy of consumers’ homes? On a second-by-second basis, Vizio collected a selection of pixels on the screen that it matched to a database of TV, movie, and commercial content. What’s more, Vizio identified viewing data from cable or broadband service providers, set-top boxes, streaming devices, DVD players, and over-the-air broadcasts. Add it all up and Vizio captured as many as 100 billion data points each day from millions of TVs.

Vizio then turned that mountain of data into cash by selling consumers’ viewing histories to advertisers and others. And let’s be clear: We’re not talking about summary information about national viewing trends. According to the complaint, Vizio got personal. The company provided consumers’ IP addresses to data aggregators, who then matched the address with an individual consumer or household. Vizio’s contracts with third parties prohibited the re-identification of consumers and households by name, but allowed a host of other personal details – for example, sex, age, income, marital status, household size, education, and home ownership. And Vizio permitted these companies to track and target its consumers across devices.

That’s what Vizio was up to behind the screen, but what was the company telling consumers? Not much, according to the complaint.

Source here

Well for their offense Vizio was slapped with 2.2million fine. Sounds like a lot, right? Well as a colleague of mine observed, that is 20cents per TV. In other words, it was a great ROI for Vizio and points out how toothless the FTC really is.

So what to do? Turn off all the Smart TV features, boycott Vizio (that said, Samsung and others are just as bad it may appear). Better Yet, unplug the TV from the Internet.

Some sites suggest that Roku and Apple streaming boxes front-ending your TV are better. I am not so sure as I know with the Roku, at least, one needs to reset your ID often to clear the tracking and there does not appear to be a permanent “Kill” switch for this type of spyware crap.

I am toying of building my own set top streaming device using the RasberryPI. If I do so, I will pay pay special attention to the privacy aspects of the embedded software I use and report findings here. Don’t hold your breath, time is at a premium of here.

Anyway – welcome to the iDIoT. The Insecure Dumbed-down Internet of Things

Nick

Ghostery – Bad Design

I am constantly evaluating browser add-ons and recently took a harder look at Ghostery. I notice that settings could not be saved when I closed the browser and then restarted. Why? Well it seems that Ghostery stores these in a cookie.

What a Cookie? Shame Shame Shame. **ALL** browsers should be set to dump cache and all cookies when you close it. Why? It helps greatly to prevent tracking and those targeted adverts among others.

What to use instead? A good and efficient ad-blocker. like uBlock I am also using uBlock Origin which appears to have a wider feature set and extra privacy settings. Both can be downloaded from your favorite browser ad-ons facility. Here are a few: Firefox is here, Chrome (yuk- you are google’s product, but if you insist) is here. Safari – not on their site, but uBlock is here. I cannot find the download for uBlock Origin. Post comment with link if you know it.

Direct uBlock Origin releases are here, but they may not be verify by the browser yet.

Nick